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Walk 3 Woodland Track off Forest Road
This circuit walk through heathy woodland and woodland mostly follows vehicle tracks behind Anglesea. The tree-lined track provides good habitat for native fauna. Walkers pass through the newly established day visitor centre and campground, a great birdwatching area on the edge of Marshy Creek. Many small orchids grow beside the track.
STARTING POINT:
Start of Woodland Track off Forest Road
TIME AND DISTANCE:
2–3 hr – 6.5 km circuit
LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY:
Easy to moderate. Look out for motorbikes
How to get there

From the roundabout at the corner of the Great Ocean Road and Forest Road turn into Forest Road and continue for 8.0 km to Woodland Track. Turn left and drive 100 m. Park on side of gravel access track.

Walk Notes
Blue-winged Parrot

Begin the walk at the start of Woodland Track off Forest Road. The track winds downhill with the canopy of eucalypts providing sheltered habitat for the growth of understorey heathland plants. There are some great swathes of Sweet Wattle flowering in early winter, and some fine patches of the Curly Wig Sedge which is quite rare in the district. The track winds past revegetated gravel pits on your left before bringing you to the entrance to the day visitor centre and campground, established on the former Geelong Rifle Club site, and take the track to the right. This is a very special area on the flats of Marshy Creek (Anglesea River) which is underground in this section. The damper marshy areas provide ideal conditions for frogs and other small creatures. There are some tall old trees with large hollows and fine specimens of Black Wattle.

Having walked south-west through the area you will reach Cecil Track. Turn left and walk down to Gum Flat Road. Turn left again and a short walk along Gum Flat Road will bring you to Woodland Track.

As you return back up along Woodland Track, stop occasionally to enjoy the view behind you.

Bird and Frog Calls
Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo
Common Eastern Froglet
Eastern Banjo Frog

Yellow-tailed Cockatoo (Recording by Marc Anderson, CC BY); Common Eastern Froglet & Eastern Banjo Frog (Recordings  by Ric Longmore in Australian National Botanic Gardens)

Check Out Fauna & Flora Below

Curly Wig Sedge (Photo by Poyt448 CC BY)
Eastern Banjo Frog (Photo by Fir0002/Flagstaffotos CC BY)
Salmon Sun Orchid (Photo by Margaret MacDonald)

Sweet Wattle (Photo by Ellinor Campbell)
Black Wattle (Photo by Ellinor Campbell)
Small Spider Orchid (Photo by Margaret MacDonald)

Common Eastern Froglet (Photo by David Paul CC BY)
Yellow-tailed Cockatoo (Photo by Rob Shepherd)
Donkey Orchid (Photo by Margaret MacDonald)

Video by Samantha Madell